The Ericksons

Category Archives: Reviews


book review

“When We Were Vikings,” by Andrew David MacDonald is one of the most engrossing books I’ve read in a long time—and I read a lot of good books.


book review

As someone who is a beginner to Church history, this series has been an exciting eye-opener. I’ve often heard of various heresies and subsequent ecumenical councils that were convened to clear them up, but it was difficult to keep all of them straight. “The Church and the Roman Empire” lays everything out in easy to understand language with a dramatic Read more…


book review

As I read “The Early Church: St. Peter, the Apostles, and Martyrs,” by James L. Papandrea, I was reading an exciting family history. Names I have heard many times became attached to stories of the real people who were part of the Church’s beginnings.The Early Church Made ApproachablePapandrea’s background is theologically rich and deep, yet, “The Early Church” was very Read more…


book review

Lori Erickson is an Episcopalian deacon, as well as a travel writer. Her latest project has fused her love of spirituality and global travel in “Near the Exit: Travels with the Not-So-Grim Reaper.” For the last year, I have been reading a lot about death and the ceremonies surrounding our farewell to this life. “Near the Exit” seemed like an Read more…


book review

“Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me,” by Adrienne Brodeur is a fascinating memoir about a daughter and her mother and the unhealthy dynamic between them. We get our first glimpse of their relationship the night that Malabar, Adrienne’s mother, wakes 14-year-old Adrienne to tell her, “Ben Souther just kissed me!” Ben Souther was the best friend of Malabar’s Read more…


book review

From the very first line, I was drawn into this book. “I am going to use the cheese wire on you.” Wow! “I Will Make You Pay,” by Teresa Driscoll was everything I hoped it would be. I’ve read “I Am Watching You” and “The Promise,” and loved both. Like those novels, “I will Make You Pay,” takes place in Read more…


book review

“Once More unto the Breach” by Meghan Holloway is yet another book in the popular WWII historical fiction genre. But this novel definitely stands on its own. It is as much mystery and suspense as war and romance.The plot of “Once More unto the Breach” was intricate and completely original, as was the cast of characters:  Rhys, a Welsh farmer Read more…


book review

“I’ve Seen the End of You: A Neurosurgeon’s Look at Faith, Doubt, and the Things We Think We Know,” by W. Lee Warren M.D. is a heart-rending book. Part, memoir, part odyssey, “I’ve Seen the End of You,” follows the lives and deaths of Dr. Warren’s patients. Dr. Warren shares the deep struggle he has faced countless times as a Read more…


book review

“The Yellow Lantern” by Angie Dicken is the 3rd book in the True Colors Series. True Colors features “historical stories of American crime.” I’ve been a huge fan of this series starting with “The White City,” and followed up by “The Pink Bonnet.”“The Yellow Lantern” takes place in 1824. It features a ring of body snatchers who steal the bodies Read more…


book review

“What Does It Feel Like to Die?: Inspiring New Insights into the Experience of Dying” by Jennie Dear may seem like the last book I would want to read only a few weeks after my husband died of Stage 4 lung cancer in our home on hospice. But I am so glad that I did read it. So many questions Read more…


book review

Henri Nouwen has a gift for expressing the deep truths of an intimate walk with God, in a very accessible way. So I was very excited when I heard that “Following Jesus: Finding Our Way Home in an Age of Anxiety,” was ready to hit the bookshelves. This is some of Nouwen’s never before published work. It focuses on how Read more…


book review

After the 1st book in the “True Colors” series, blew me away, I was looking forward to the next offering in the series. I was rewarded! In “The Pink Bonnet,” author, Liz Tolsma, explores the underbelly of Memphis Tennessee in the 1930s when parents dared not to leave their children alone, for fear they may just disappear.Imagine leaving your child Read more…


book review

“Those People” by Louise Candlish is a mystery/psychological thriller set in England that strikes at the heart of where you live. I found it incredibly gripping, similar to the 1990 film, “Pacific Heights,” about a bad renter. Only this was more disturbing, because you don’t have to become a landlord, but you can rarely control who moves into your neighborhood. Read more…


book review

“The Sentence is Death” by Anthony Horowitz is the 2nd book in the Detective Daniel Hawthorne Series. The first book in the series is “The Word Is Murder.” What makes this series so unique is how “meta”[1] it is. Horowitz places himself in the story as a writer who is following and working with a disgraced detective turned police consultant, Read more…


book review

“Shadow among Sheaves” is a beautiful allegory of the story of Ruth and Boaz from the Bible. Naomi Stephens sets this tale in 1857, when there was much anti-India sentiment in England, due to a bloody rebellion in the empire’s colony. Yet, Rena fell in love with a British officer and married him. When she and her mother-in-law, both found Read more…


book review

“Man of the Year” by Caroline Louise Walker immediately grabbed me with its biting honest narrative. Sag Harbor has just honored Dr. Robert Hart as the Man of the Year. His entire community looks up to him (or at least they act as if they do). It looks like he has it all. How far will he go to keep Read more…


book review

“A Serial Killer’s Daughter: My Story of Faith, Love, and Overcoming by Kerri Rawson is aptly named. The book isn’t about Dennis Rader (also known as BTK) the serial killer who terrorized Wichita, Kansas. It’s about his daughter and her process of recovering after the trauma of learning that her father was BTK. This might sound like semantics, but for Read more…


App Review

As a writer, it’s essential for me to have a constant spark of creativity. So, whenever a tool comes along that helps generate ideas, I have to try it out.  I’m excited to share my favorite creativity app with you. It is called the brainsparker app. I can’t think of a better name for it. “Brainsparker is a creativity app designed to Read more…


book review

“Whence and Whither: On Lives and Living,” is a collection of writings by Thomas Lynch. Lynch is a poet who also happens to be a funeral director. He is known for his observations on death. “Whence and Whither,” as its subtitle indicates, is much more about life and living it well. It’s easy to see that lynch is a poet, Read more…


Book Review Template

As I wrap up my series on how to write a review, I want to share my favorite tool with you, as well as tell you how I use it. It’s a review template. This particular template is for a fiction book review, although I’ve included a couple of questions for nonfiction books at the bottom of the list. Feel free Read more…

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