The Ericksons

Using Character Templates

I recently began reading a book that I put down after 3 short chapters. I wanted to read it. The premise was good, but some of the basic elements that make a story good were all wrong. Those elements all had to do with characterization. Writing characters well is essential to making a fiction book work. Characters are who we relate to in a story, who we love, and who we despise. There are right ways and wrong ways to write characters. Over the next few weeks, I’m going to share how to get characters right—or at least, how to not get them wrong. I will begin with the use of character templates.

Character Templates

When people create their character, they often begin with forms known as character templates. If you’re a writer interested in craft, you have likely seen these online. You’ve probably downloaded them, and maybe you’ve even used them.

There is nothing inherently wrong with these templates. In fact, they can be quite helpful as you explore who your character is. Unfortunately, too many authors use them incorrectly. They end up sounding more like an application for an online dating service, than aspects of a deep character.

“Blond hair, blue eyes, likes Chinese food, hates alien invaders.”

So what about these character templates? Should you delete them from your hard drive and never use them again? There’s no need to be that drastic. In fact, there are several ways they can help you to write characters well.

Character templates keep track of the details.

Some stories require lots of details that can easily become forgotten or confused. That’s a huge mistake that readers are sure to notice. Stories that most easily fall victim to this are:

  • Series- When you need to stay consistent from one book to the next, good notes and templates are essential.
  • Epic Saga- These larger than life stories are so long that you might forget what happened at the beginning by the time you get to the end. Mix up one detail, though, and your readers will pick up on it.
  • Fantasy- There are so many elements in a fantasy novel that a writer has to come up with that it’s easy for some details to slip through the cracks. Character templates as well as templates to keep track of the various aspects of the world you are creating can help greatly.

The purpose of the character templates is to keep track of the details. They are not intended to be a foundation from which to buil.

Character templates can help bring your character to life.

All of these details can turn a 2 dimensional idea into a larger than life character. This has to happen in your mind before it can happen in the minds of your readers. Somewhere in between, all of that magic is sprinkled on the pages of your book. But how do you make that magic?

Remember when I spoke of the template sounding like an online dating service? There is something people do when they read personal ads online. They fill in the gaps.

  • They may see an ad for one guy and imagine him to be really dorky. They may even get a good laugh or two with their friends, as they imagine what a date with him might look like. He’s sure to take his date to the Star Trek Convention.
  • Or, they might see another guy and imagine him to be really creepy. The kind of guy who will live with his mother for forever and looks through the holes he’s drilled through the walls of the hotel his family owns.
  • Of course, he could be a brilliant and witty real estate agent who will treat his date with respect and sweep her off her feet with his sense of humor and dashing good looks.

The key is to help your readers fill in the gaps.

Readers don’t like to be spoon-fed details. Like salt, they like to have details sprinkled throughout the story so that they can draw their own conclusions. This gives readers a sense of satisfaction and helps them to feel a part of the story.

So feel free to fill in your character templates as much as you want to, but use care when deciding what, and how much you actually write into the story. For example, I recently was watching a show that I’ve been watching for a while now. There is a government law enforcement agent on the show who has always been somewhat in the background. In a single episode they took this mild-mannered guy, gave him a heroic task, and had him killed while carrying it out heroically. It was so shocking. Then they topped it off by revealing that he was the son of a top CIA officer. He didn’t want any special treatment. That one detail alone made this otherwise forgettable character, unforgettable. Timing is everything.

All characters have a history

When I am creating a character, I worry more about their past than their eye color. Let your readers fill in details that don’t matter. This allows them to see the character as they want to. It’s the backstory of the character that will affect your story. It determines how they will act in a given situation.

Your minor characters need a backstory as much as your main characters. This is the kind of writing that makes minor characters stand out. I recently took my daughters to see The Princess Bride in at a 1950’s style theater. It was so much fun. A few things stood out. One was the number of scene stealers there were in the movie. These are the characters that are only on the screen for a few moments, but get the biggest laughs. They are the characters that people are still quoting 25 years later.

Characters like the minister, played by Peter Cook:

And Miracle Max, played by Billy Crystal:

Essentials: Beyond Character Templates

As you are writing templates for main characters, it’s essential to think about their motivations and their background. You won’t write all of these into the story, but you will take them into consideration as you develop your character.

For minor characters, come up with one aspect that makes them completely unique from the rest of your characters. It could be something physical, or the way they talk. It may be an unusual job or hobby.

In the coming weeks we’ll be looking at how to take these details from your character template or notes and make lifelike characters for your story.

I will cover the basics of:

  • Making Character’s Believable
  • Transformation in your Character
  • A Character’s Appearance
  • Dialogue

Do you use a character template?

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

The Ericksons


It’s the 1st Wednesday of the month again. That’s when I take part in Alex J. Cavanaugh’s Insecure Writer’s Support Group. I encourage you to check out their website and even sign up for the IWSG Newsletter. Today I’m going to explore self-publishing with print-on-demand, as I answer the #IWSG question for September –

What publishing path are you considering/did you take, and why?

When I first decided to write my book, Facing Cancer as a Friend, I felt as though I was looking at a timer, counting down the amount of time I had to get a platform set up and some words on the page. It was a midlife realignment of my goals. I had always wanted to be a writer, but I let life get in the way and stopped writing for a long time.

print-on-demand

Print-on-Demand Services changed all that

Self-publishing prior to print-on-demand was often called vanity publishing, and with good reason. Prior to this evolution in the publishing industry, writers would pay publishers to print a certain number of books. Most often the author was stuck with hundreds of unsold copies by the end of their lifetime.  It was an unappealing notion. Print-on-demand potentially meant that the only thing you risked by self-publishing with them, was your time and your reputation. And by 2015 when I began writing again, print-on-demand was in full swing, thanks in great part to Amazon.com and its affiliated companies such as Createspace.

There are drawbacks

Print-on-Demand has made self-publishing far more approachable to writers across the spectrum of the business. There are also some drawbacks to self-publishing, even with the benefit of print-on-demand and e-book publishing. This is especially true for new writers.

Because

  • Self-publishers who do everything themselves, often lack the professional, experienced support of editors. It’s all too common to find books that are “obviously self-published.” A multitude of mistakes and formatting errors that never would have made it past an experienced editor’s eyes fill some of these books from start to finish. It’s understandable. New self-published authors have to learn the skills of an entire team of people who would normally prepare a book for publication. My first book was no different. That’s why this year I am revising it completely to fix errors I didn’t realize I had made.

 

  • Self-publishers have to market their book on their own. Most writers aren’t born marketers. They are writers. With the self-publishing model, writers must find time to write, edit, publish, and market their book—and then do it again. Part of marketing is having a platform. This often includes blogging and maintaining a website and a social media presence, along with your other jobs. It’s not the most efficient way to do things.

 

  • Self-published writers are the ugly stepsister of the writing business. People often look down of them because of a few bad apples that have lowered the bar, in terms of quality.

But there’s good news

Even professional writers such as Stephen King have dipped their toe into the self-publishing world. You get a far greater percentage of the royalties, and once you are established in the business with a solid platform and a good reputation, online bookstores like Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble make marketing and selling your print-on-demand and e-books far easier.

I’m also encouraged whenever I find a self-published author who is doing it right. They are improving the quality of the print-on-demand and e-book markets. It can be incredibly difficult to break into the traditional publishing model. It’s fun to see writers also become entrepreneurs. Often they are using professional services for editing and cover creation, creating jobs and transforming the industry.

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

The Ericksons


My crabby neighbor

Karen Hume of the fantastic blog, Profound Journey, posted 25 Totally Terrifying Meaning of Life Questions Worth Asking Yourself. I bookmarked them and intend to answer one every so often. For me, it really is terrifying. Even though I share a lot of my life on my other site, Facing Cancer with Grace, there’s also a lot I keep to myself. In an effort to be brave and transparent I am going to share a childhood memory of my crabby neighbor as I answer question # 7:

When was the first time you were afraid? (Question from Natalie Goldberg).

When I was about 5 years old…

I lived in St. Paul. We had an alley behind our home that was perfect for riding a bike down, as it started on one street which was at a higher elevation than the street it emptied onto.

I knew all of our neighbors except for one, the neighbor who lived across the street. But I did know about him—at least I thought I did. I thought he must be mean. He was old (like most of my neighbors). I didn’t see him a lot, and when I did, he appeared to be a very angry man. It was something about his body language, the way he pinched up his face. He walked as though he had a stone in his shoe. He would scold neighborhood children for being too loud. When he took out his trash (which was when I saw him most often) He would toss the bag into the can with a crash. Now that I’m older, I think he probably was in pain from some physical ailment. As a 5-year-old, I didn’t understand that. What I did know was that I didn’t ever want to run into my crabby neighbor.

Then one day I did

It was spring of 1980. I was wearing cut off shorts and a white top with thin horizontal rainbow stripes. The sun was hot on the top of my head. My feet were dirty from playing barefoot all morning. The massive lilac bush at the end of the ally was so fragrant that I could smell it from the top of the hill where I straddled my banana seat bike. It had stars and stripes on it that reminded me of Wonder Woman.

I had only recently learned how to ride without training wheels in that very alley. It didn’t take long for me to feel very confident in my abilities as a cyclist extraordinaire. I had been riding up and down the alley all morning long. Down was the best. I could feel the breeze as I coasted at top speed.

Then it happened

I was coasting down the hill and my foot slipped off the pedal. The bike wobbled as I lost my balance and down I tumbled. I landed on my left side. My right foot seared with pain. Somehow the pinky toe on my right foot became caught between the chain and the sprocket of my bike. It was bleeding which scared me even more. I cried out in pain. I looked toward my house which may as well have been a mile away. How would I get there?

Then I saw my crabby neighbor

I don’t know if he heard me crying or if he just happened to come outside at that point, but he was there, walking in my direction. I was so afraid of him that tried to squirm away from my crabby neighbor, but I couldn’t. “Settle down. What’s going on here?” He lifted up the bike and turned the pedal backward. My toe was released. It was bloody, bruised, and black from the chain grease. “You’ll be okay.” His voice was still gruff.

I got to my feet and picked up my bike. I whimpered a “thank you” and limped back to my house.

“Get some shoes on.”

A lesson learned

I never encountered my crabby neighbor, again. I also never rode my bike barefoot, again. For some reason, in the narrative of my life, this was a profound experience. Maybe it was the intense physical pain combined with fear and helplessness that has etched it so firmly in my memory. It was also interesting that looking back, I have a fondness for my crabby neighbor. Everything I know about him is tainted by my 5-year-old perspective. It would be nice to be able to go back in time and tell him how much I appreciate him helping me out that day.

I’m sure I had been afraid earlier in my life, but this is the earliest memory I have of being afraid. What is YOUR earliest memory of being afraid? Did you have a memorable neighbor?

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

My Family
The Erickson Family, Photo by Everbranch Photography

writer's rut

Sometimes life hands you lemonade right after you’ve brushed your teeth. That’s how the last few weeks have felt for me. Dealing with a medical emergency for one of my children as well as a turn of events in my husband’s cancer, left me little time to write. That happens sometimes, doesn’t it? The problem is that writing is almost as necessary as air for a writer.  How do you get out of a writer’s rut?

Getting out of a writer’s rut can be a chore

In physics, there is a principle known as Newton’s first law of motion – sometimes referred to as the law of inertia.

“An object at rest stays at rest and an object in motion stays in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.”

So here we are in a writer’s rut. We will stay in this rut without being acted upon by some unbalanced force. That requires effort.

Be willing to accept less than the best

Sometimes as writers, we feel as though we need to create something great with our words or it’s not worth the effort. This can lead to writer’s rut. We sit in front of our laptops with fingers poised to tap out a tale for the ages and nothing of consequence comes to our minds. Call it distraction or writer’s block. Whatever it is, you can get beyond it.

Because the ideas may not come easily, you might need to resort to some of my favorite tools. The first is the Jar of Ideas (click on the link to learn more about using a jar of ideas). These are pre-written writing prompts which you can pull out of a jar and use to spark creativity. Sometimes they will yield a good piece of writing. Just as often, the result is blah. That’s okay. You are creating a habit. You are moving out of the writer’s rut.

Try a different environment

Getting out of a writer’s rut sometimes requires a different location. When I struggle to stay focused, I go to my local coffee shop, buy a smoothie and write for a couple of hours. I always manage to leave feeling as though I’ve accomplished something. That feeling of accomplishment is invigorating. You remember why you chose to be a writer.

Respond to get out of a writer’s rut

Another way to get you into the writing mood is to read an article in a newspaper, blog, or magazine. Then respond. You don’t have to send your response. The exercise of processing someone else’s thoughts on a topic and then responding to them becomes a sort of conversation. Most people never have trouble talking to other people. This is very much like that. The important thing is that it gives you a little push. Sometimes, that’s all you need.

I’m in a writer’s rut

I haven’t written much in the last couple of weeks and when I do write, it feels uninspired. Yet, I need to keep going. I’m behind on my blogging schedule and I haven’t gotten any farther on my revision of Facing Cancer as a Friend.

This post is the product of what I am talking about: getting back on the horse and riding until it feels natural again.  Hopefully, it will help you get out of your writer’s rut.

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

My Family


12 things about me

Life in our house is a little crazy right now. My husband is participating in a clinical trial for lung cancer at the Mayo Clinic to treat. One of our daughters has been dealing with her own medical problems, so I thought I would do something different this week by sharing 12 things about me.

  1. What does your ideal day look like?

My ideal day would begin with me waking up to a quiet clean house. I would have a strong cup of coffee and spend the day writing. At noon, I would go to lunch with my daughters and have happy hour sushi at Hajime. I would end the day as I always do, snuggling in front of Netflix with my husband.

  1. What did you want to be when you were younger?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer. Always.

  1. Who would you love to meet? What would you ask?

I would love to meet my husband’s maternal grandmother. She died long before I married my husband so I never had the opportunity, but I feel as though I know her because of all the stories her children and grandchildren tell about her. She was an amazing woman. I have often been told, “It’s too bad you didn’t get a chance to meet her. You would have loved her.” I would just ask her about her life and for stories about the family.

  1. What habit would you most like to break? What habit would you most like to start?

I often feel like I talk too much and listen too little. I would like to reverse those.

  1. Think of a person you truly admire. What qualities do you like about that person?

There are so many people I admire. One of the things I admire the most in some people is the sweet, peaceful spirit. Not being cynical. I suppose you can find that in various walks of life, but especially spiritual people have this peace. When I spend time in the quiet, I feel that way. I suppose because rather than hearing the bad news of the day, I feel close to God. There is serenity in that.

  1. How do you like to relax?

I like to do some sort of hard work and expend a lot of energy to the point of sweating and feeling fatigued. Then, I take a nice hot shower and get into some comfortable clothes. Then I sit in front of a fan and write. I did this today, so it is the first thing that came to mind. I feel quite relaxed, now.

  1. When was the last time you did something you were afraid of?

This past couple of weeks, I have been walking through the valley of the shadow of death. I’m not supposed to fear evil, but I admit I do. We had to hospitalize one of our daughters. At the same time, my husband is beginning an experimental course of treatment at the Mayo Clinic. I feel overwhelmed and afraid.

  1. What qualities do you admire in others?

I admire kindness. I’ll give you an example: Today I was at Walmart in the beverage aisle. I needed to get some low-cal Gatorade, and for some reason, it is always on the highest shelf. I’m only 5’3” with the best posture I can muster, so I’m trying to give myself a post by stepping on the lowest shelf while grabbing the highest shelf with one hand so I don’t slip. With the other hand, I grab a Gatorade. I have to repeat this ridiculous display for every bottle I grab. A woman came around the corner and chuckled. “It’s a hard life for us short folk ain’t it?” she says with a smile. Just then a very tall black man with beautiful long dreadlocks came around the corner. He must have been over 7 feet tall. “Let me help you with that,” he said. Relieved, I let him fill my basket with the bottles I needed. That one little act of kindness is still making me smile. People who take the time to do something nice for a stranger are becoming harder and harder to find. I think it’s because our society is so busy.

  1. What is your favorite song? Why?

I Love Everything About You by Darlene Zschech

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUDK8BRfZ_g

This was the song we had sung at our wedding. It still describes how my husband and I feel about each other.

Catch a Falling Star by Peri Como (Sung by Jane Morgan)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPebTHj98zo

It’s just fun and it always makes me feel happy

  1. What excites you?

I get excited by cultural experiences such as museums, concerts, displays, etc. I love unusual things, new things, things that open my mind to a new way of seeing the world. Any opportunity I have to learn something new, I grab it. Recently between appointments at the Mayo, my husband and I took a tour featuring the art and architecture on the medical campus. We learned a lot about works of art that people pass every day on the way to get answers about what means the most to them–their health. The Mayo recognizes the benefits of art to the healing process.

  1. What do you wish you did more of?

Exercise. I know it would be good for me and I even enjoy it. Unfortunately, there is a fine line between good exercise and a rheumatoid arthritis flare. Those flares stick in the back of my mind, so I subconsciously fear exercise. Xi gong is helpful, but I haven’t made it a habit, yet.

  1. Pretend money is no object. What would you do?

Travel. I would travel everywhere! I would take my family and see the world.

Now that you know 12 things about me…

I would love to know how you would answer some of these questions.

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

The Ericksons


beta readers

Most authors use beta readers to help them prepare their book for publication. It’s extra work and takes more time, but this is a step you won’t want to skip if you want your book to be as good as possible. How do you get beta readers? What do they do for you?

Beta readers go by several different names

  • Beta readers
  • Street Team
  • Advance Readers
  • Launch Team
  • Book Crew
  • Review Crew

I call my beta readers “Advance Readers,” because they read my book in advance of it being in its final form (more about that later).

What do Beta Readers Do?

Authors not only use a variety of names for their beta readers, but they utilize their beta readers in several different ways, depending on what they need most.

Do you :

  • Need feedback to help you decide what to cut and what to keep?
  • Welcome proofreading from those who excel at spotting typos?
  • Have specific questions you need to have answered?

I personally have my team of Advance Readers read an early version of my book. I ask for feedback, both specific and general and make a lot of changes based on their responses. Then, once the book is ready to publish, I send my beta readers a final copy of the book so they can see the finished product. At that time, I ask them to post a review on Amazon and Goodreads.

There are some drawbacks to my method

The chances of my beta readers reading the book a second time (when they get the final copy) are slim, so I risk getting a review based on a less-than-the-best version. To minimize this, try to have your book in fairly good shape before you send the first copy to your beta readers. I always think mine is looking pretty good and then discover a multitude of problems after I’ve sent copies to my beta readers.

The thing I gain from this method is the insight of my readers. They often see things I missed, so I can fix those issues before the book goes to print.

There are 4 basic methods that a beta reader can use to give you feedback

  1. Call it as they see it

This method works well with Microsoft Word’s Track Changes feature as well as the equivalent in Google Docs. Your reader can make any notes they want as they read. You will get lots of detailed observations and proofreading notes with this method.

  1. Chapter by Chapter

With this method, your reader will make some observations at the end of each chapter. This is especially helpful when you have specific questions such as whether “this chapter” even belongs in the book. One of the great things about it is that it doesn’t feel overwhelming to your beta reader, yet they will be giving you useful feedback.

  1. The Big Picture

This is my personal least favorite, but it’s still better than nothing. With this method, many things bet forgotten or left out of the feedback. This is especially good if you are confident in your editor and just want to know if there are any glaring problems. It is also perfect when you are looking more for a review than for feedback. We will talk more about that in a future post on launching your book.

  1. You can answer specific questions

Often writers have certain things they want to know. Should this chapter be cut? Should I use this ending, instead? Etc. These are often very professional, seasoned writers who are checking out a few nagging issues. When you use this method, put together the questions and let them know that these are the concerns you need them to consider. Some writers prefer to ask the questions after the reader has finished the book in order to get big picture answers. This is often thought to better mimic the actual reading experience. How you approach it will depend on what you need most.

A note about working with family members

It’s fine to have family members be part of your beta reader team. Be aware of how honest they are being with you, though. Sometimes when we are close to someone, they hesitate to give us the brutal honesty we need at this point on the process. If they understand that their honesty is crucial, you will probably be fine.  This is like my favorite example of letting someone walk around with spinach in their teeth. You aren’t being nice if you don’t say anything.

Create a tracking sheet

This will help you keep all of your beta readers on track. Some things to record on this tracking sheet are:

  • Who did you send a copy to?
  • Have you sent a reminder email after 2 weeks?
  • Have you received their feedback, yet?

I also like to create a folder in my email in which to keep any correspondence with my beta readers. If someone doesn’t follow through, you will want to remember if you use them as a beta reader on another book that you might not be able to count on getting a response from them. Some writers choose to draw a line in the sand after 1 or 2 experiences like this. I tend to be a bit more lenient. Sometimes, life happens.

I love my Advance Readers! They make such a difference in the quality of my books. Do you use beta readers? Have you ever been a beta reader? I’d love to hear about your experiences!

What are YOUR thoughts?

I’d love to hear in the comment section, below. I appreciate my readers as well as the writing community. To show that appreciation, I use Comment Luv. Just leave a comment below and your latest post will get a link next to it. Thank you!

About Heather Erickson

I am an author, writer, and speaker and homeschooling mom of 3. Since doctors diagnosed my husband, Dan with stage IV lung cancer in 2012, I’ve focused my writing and speaking on helping cancer patients and their families advocate for themselves and live life to the fullest, in spite of their illness. My goal is to help people face cancer with grace. My books are available at Amazon.com:

The Memory Maker’s Journal 

Facing Cancer as a Friend: How to Support Someone Who Has Cancer

Facing Cancer as a Parent: Helping Your Children Cope with Your Cancer

I also blog about living with cancer at Facing Cancer with Grace.

Buy Facing Cancer as a Friend Today!

 

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